Academic Recognition of BrainWise

Posted On: July 11, 2007

BrainWise was one of 20 programs selected to be presented in June of 2005 at the Adolescent Brain Conference at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Conference participants were selected because their work applied research findings that won Dr. Eric Kandel the 2000 Nobel Prize in Medicine. Dr. Barry presented her research on a BrainWise pilot study at five different school sites.

In 2007 her paper covering the results of the pilot study, co-authored by Dr. Marilyn Welsh, was published in Adolescent Psychopathology and the Developing Brain:  Integrating Brain and Prevention Science a book by Oxford University Press.

For a complete copy of the paper go to the BrainWise website at www.brainwise-plc.org or contact BrainWise at info@brainwise-plc.org

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