A BrainWise Teaching Tip: RED FLAG ACTIVITY

Posted On: September 15, 2017

TEACHING TIP:  RED FLAG ACTIVITY

Sarah Hays TeachingPlease welcome Sarah Hays as a new BrainWise Board Member.  Sarah is a School Prevention Specialist, middle school teacher and BrainWise instructor and trainer. At a recent training of instructors, Sarah offered a fun teaching tip and activity for children and teens. The adults had as much fun as the students. This activity can be done individually,in teams or in groups. Distribute an outline of an age-appropriate figure to each participant. (Below is an example to use with children.)

 

Red Flag Buddy

Publication1 Directions:

1. Mark on Buddy the areas where you feel Internal Red Flags.  Share answers and talk about the internal senses they elicit – pressure, heat, chills, dizziness, headache, tightness, sinking sensation, choking, breathing changes, rapid heart rate, etc.

2. Next, mark areas on Buddy that showcase External Red Flags.  Share answers and talk about the warnings they send.  Discuss the internal feelings that external red flags can bring on – a red face is feeling hot, a clenched fist is feeling tight with rapid heart rate.

3. Add additional information on Red Flags to Buddy.

4. Finally, discuss other types of External Red Flags – the dirty look someone gives you, or the empty cans of beer on the porch – and what internal Red Flags they raise. Add these to the backside of the Buddy page.

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