BrainWise Makes a New Connection: Confidence Based Learning

Posted On: October 5, 2009

BrainWise is taking its curriculum to the next level by joining forces with SatoriEDU – the education arm of Knowledge Factor, Inc. The joint effort introduces Confidence-Based Learning (CBL), an online, interactive method that will be used to measure people’s knowledge of BrainWise skills and their confidence in that knowledge.

Originally designed as a business tool to improve organizational productivity and enhance employee performance, CBL identifies gaps in knowledge and confidence, then closes those gaps by helping people obtain the information they need to know.CBL has its roots in more than 70 years of research into the connection between confidence, correctness, retention and learning.

Tim Adams, Chief Academic Officer at SatoriEDU, is enthusiastic about teaming with BrainWise to provide an online educational assessment tool for thinking skills.“We are able to measure the confidence a person has, which is a predictor of action,” Adams said.Citing years of research which has shown that content retention levels increase significantly with a confidence-based approach to training, Adams points out that, “People who are ‘confidently correct’ take actions that are productive.”

The joint BrainWise/CBL model teaches people about the brain through easy-to-remember terms and activities that show them how thinking skills, called the 10 Wise Ways, build neural pathways in the brain, replacing the impulsive and emotional reactions of the Lizard Brain with rational decisions.Those pathways can be created when thinking skills are applied, used and reinforced.

According to BrainWise founder Dr. Patricia Gorman Barry, “This partnership is a positive step forward for BrainWise.Incorporating CBL into the BrainWise curriculum will help people quickly achieve mastery of the decision-making process so they make smart choices with confidence.”

For additional information about CBL visit SatoriEDU at http://satoriedu.com.

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