BrainWise Stories: School Instead of Prison

Posted On: November 11, 2015

I taught BrainWise to students the school identified as high risks for staying in school.  Gangs were a serious problem in the community, and I invited some former students who were now in high school, to talk with my class.  The news had reported the recent murder of a man who had been shot and killed because he parked his car in a space that his assailant and friends had claimed belonged to them.  Shouting erupted, and the assailant and his friends attacked him and shot him.  I was shocked when one of my former students told the class that the shooter and his friends were his former “homies.”  He said that he would have been with them if he had not learned BrainWise, how to get off his emotions elevator, and to think about the consequences of his choices. He told the class, “They are in jail, and I am in school and going to graduate.”  Brenda B., Middle School Teacher and BrainWise Instructor

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