BrainWise Success with Homeless Men

Posted On: April 12, 2014

Marilyn Welsh, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of Northern Colorado and a national expert on measuring Executive Functions, reports the following findings from the first set of data collected on homeless men receiving BrainWise. Thirty-five men completed pretests and posttests, and the demonstrated statistically significant improvements on the following measures: WASIK Problem Solving Scale: improved overall problem solving score; BRIEF (Behavior Research Inventory of Executive Functions): significant improvement on flexibility/shifting and self-monitoring scores; and BKS (BrainWise Knowledge Survey): improved ability to recognize, identify and respond to problems. Data on a control group are being analyzed. The men are part of the New Life Program at the Crossing, a residence for homeless run by The Denver Rescue Mission.

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